Sunday, June 10, 2018

A Journey of Faith 6 - Reading the Scriptures Through the Eyes of Jesus


Text for the Week: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has chosen me to bring good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind; to set free the oppressed and announce that the time has come when the Lord will save his people.” Luke 4:18-19

Welcome to our services today and a special welcome to any worshipping with us for the first time. Today is Sunday Special and so our young people are meeting for a late breakfast and activities from 10-15 and for the first part of our service. All the best TV dramas begin each episode with that tantalisingly brief collection of snippets from previous episodes that enables you to catch up with the story. So, in that tradition, Previously … we began on Easter Sunday in the very last chapter in Luke’s Gospel on the Emmaus Road when Jesus opened up the Old Testament to two of his followers. That evening he did the same with the rest of his followers back in Jerusalem. From that day on they ‘got it’: they now began to read the Old Testament Scriptures in the way Jesus had opened up for them. Reading through Luke’s story of the beginning of the Church in Acts we’ve seen that the first followers of Jesus drew on the insights Jesus shared with them in their reading of the Old Testament: we’ve seen it in the speeches of Peter, Stephen, Philip and Paul. It’s is as if Luke in Acts is getting us to see that as followers of The Way, as Christians, we are to read the Old Testament through the eyes of Jesus and see in Jesus that all it stands for is brought to fulfilment. The story finishes in Acts with Paul under house arrest in Rome preaching about the Kingdom of God and teaching about the Lord Jesus Christ, speaking with all boldness and freedom. All the best TV dramas come to an end with a taster of what’s in store. Having accompanied Paul on so many of his travels and arrived with him in Rome, Luke went on to draw on the researches he had already started to commit to writing the story of Jesus and the movement he started. And so today we go back to the very beginning of the story he had to tell … and we’ll discover a thread running through the story that shows how Jesus read the Old Testament. This, I believe, is one of the pressing stories of our time: how we read our Bible. In Acts, as we have seen, and in Luke as we are going to see there are pointers that can transform the way we read some of the most difficult bits of the Bible.

Welcome and Call to Worship
213 Every new morning
Prayer and the Lord’s Prayer
Back to the beginning

All the best TV dramas begin each episode with that tantalisingly brief collection of snippets from previous episodes that enables you to catch up with the story. So, in that tradition, Previously … we began on Easter Sunday in the very last chapter in Luke’s Gospel on the Emmaus Road when Jesus opened up the Old Testament to two of his followers. That evening he did the same with the rest of his followers back in Jerusalem. From that day on they ‘got it’: they now began to read the Old Testament Scriptures in the way Jesus had opened up for them. Reading through Luke’s story of the beginning of the Church in Acts we’ve seen that the first followers of Jesus drew on the insights Jesus shared with them in their reading of the Old Testament: we’ve seen it in the speeches of Peter, Stephen, Philip and Paul. It’s is as if Luke in Acts is getting us to see that as followers of The Way, as Christians, we are to read the Old Testament through the eyes of Jesus and see in Jesus that all it stands for is brought to fulfilment. The story finishes in Acts with Paul under house arrest in Rome preaching about the Kingdom of God and teaching about the Lord Jesus Christ, speaking with all boldness and freedom.

All the best TV dramas come to an end with a taster of what’s in store. Having accompanied Paul on so many of his travels and arrived with him in Rome, Luke went on to draw on the researches he had already started to commit to writing the story of Jesus and the movement he started. And so today we go back to the very beginning of the story he had to tell … and we’ll discover a thread running through the story that shows how Jesus read the Old Testament. This, I believe, is one of the pressing stories of our time: how we read our Bible. In Acts, as we have seen, and in Luke as we are going to see there are pointers that can transform the way we read some of the most difficult bits of the Bible.

Who knows … and there are all sorts of possibilities.

The one I’m drawn to is the one that goes back in the mists of time to the early traditions of the church – that Luke and Acts were written by Luke the beloved physician who was a travelling companion of Paul.

It’s in Acts 16:10 that the narrative in Acts changes to the first person – I’m persuaded that’s when Luke joins Paul. Luke is with Paul in those bits that are in the first person plural.

Acts 16:10-17 in Philippi. The next parts of the story are in the third person until 20:5 when it’s ‘we’ again. What’s telling is that we are back in Philippi at that point. It looks as if Luke stayed in Philippi when Paul moved on. 20:5-16, Paul in Luke’s company travels to Miletus where Paul summons the leaders of the church in Ephesus and shares with them his message again. Then Luke accompanies Paul on his fateful journey to Jerusalem as he takes the collection there. Luke is with Paul in Jerusalem …  21:1-19 but we don’t have any more of the ‘we passages’ until and the decision to sail to Rome – but the implication of 27:1 is that Luke has by now joined Paul in Caesarea. That suggests that Luke is around in Jersualem and then Caesarea for the couple of years this covers. Then he is with Paul on the journey to Rome and with him in Rome.  27:1-28:16.

IN my imagining Luke has taken the opportunity while in Jerusalem and Caesarea to meet with people who had been around with Jesus and get the story of Jesus. It is at this point maybe that he begins to turn his hand to the task of putting the gospel together. It could be that that is in the 60’s. It maybe he continues to do his research and it takes him into the 70’s.

It’s at this point having followed the story through Acts we can return with Luke to the way he tells the story … and as we do that we are on the look out for the way in his telling of the story he notices how Jesus himself has a way of reading the Hebrew Scriptures we think of as the Old Testament that is apparent in that story as it unfolds.

Luke’s gospel begins as Luke explains how he is going to write. Is he writing to a particular person called Theophilus or to anyone who is a Theo Philos – a friend of God. I rather like the idea – because I think of him as writing for me!

Reading: Luke 1:1-4 – Gwyneth

Dear Theophilus:

Many people have done their best to write a report of the things that have taken place among us.

Interesting that right at the beginning Luke acknowledges that he is drawing on other accounts of Jesus. There’s a very strong argument to be had that Luke draws on Mark and on a collection of sayings of Jesus – and if you map out all the verses of Luke’s Gospel and set it alongside Matthew and Mark you can demonstrate that pretty effectively. We had the chart on the wall in our Sixth Form RE room at school. It was given me out of the blue by James. I found it on the wall of David Wenham who teaches NT in Oxford when we had that shared mission with St Luke’s and Holy Apostles and I have used it in my teaching ever since.

 2They wrote what we have been told by those who saw these things from the beginning and who proclaimed the message.

What’s interesting is that Luke also says that those people were drawing on eye-witness accounts that he also makes use of. I am persuaded of that too. Felicity and I went to the Hay  Festival and when Romola’s daughter chaired a panel discussion with four short listed for the Templeton prize for a religious book. I found myself in conversation with the winner in an Evensong service later that evening and bought the book. He makes a convincing argument from close study of the frequency of names in Jewish communities around the Mediterranean that those who are named in the Gospels have names that are characteristic of Palestine. He suggests they are named because they were the ones who told their story –Zachaeus is the one I always think of, Bar Timaeus is another.

 3And so, your Excellency, because I have carefully studied all these matters from their beginning, I thought it would be good to write an orderly account for you.

Luke has made a study – interesting he should research … so his book is not just random. It has a basis in serious research. And then it is ordered. Interestinly in that chart you can demonstrate that he treated his sources carefully and accurately, quoting Mark when he used him … and slotting in other material he came across without spoiling the passages he has used form Mark.

He writes with a clear purpose he states at the outset.

 4I do this so that you will know the full truth about everything which you have been taught.

We know where we are with Luke – and we are with someone who has done his research.

And so he begins his story. What’s apparent is that the first two chapters are very long, they tell the story of how Jesus came to be born and of his birth … they also link him with the birth of John the Baptist his cousin … and they include an account of the birth that’s also unique to Luke.

Luke has the best Greek of the New Testament. He knows what he is doing as he writes.

And the style of these two chapters is different.

They almost read as if they are written in the style of the Old Testament.

It is almost as if they are rounding off the Old Testament to bring us into the New Testament.

Whether it’s the Priestly tradition of the Temple or the tradition of the Prophets or the ways of the Psalmists in writing their Psalms it’s all there in the first two chapters of Luke.

As so often happened in the telling of the story of Israel at key points a song or a psalm shows you the significance of what’s happening.

And that happens here as well. With three songs, psalms traditionally known as canticles that give the message behind the story.

So the birth of John the Baptist is announced, the birth of Jesus is announced, Mary visits Elizabeth and then Mary’s song of praise brings out the significance of all that’s happening.

And it’s wonderful to sing …

86 Tell out my soul

Then we come to the birth of John the Baptist and Zechariah’s prophecy – and it’s this psalm or song that brings out the significance of John’s ministry and the way it relates to Jesus.

HTC 599 O bless the God of Israel
Now that we know the significance of what’s going on Luke tells us of the birth of Jesus, of the shepherds and the angels, of the way Jesus is named and of the way Jesus is presented in the Temple.

There is that a woman, the prophetess Anna, becomes the first to speak about the child to all who were waiting for God to set Jersualem free – a woman the first to declare the Good news. Never let it be said the Bible prohibits women from preaching and speaking!

Or older people for that matter.

For it is Simeon who has recognized Jesus for who he is just before.

And his song is one of the most wonderful of all – and it reminds us of the significance of this little one.

HTC 55 Faithful vigil ended

Listening and Asking Questions

Jesus then returns to Nazareth where the child grew and became strong; he was full of wisdom, and God’s blessings were upon him,. ~And the we jump to the point at which he comes of age, as it were. The age of the Jewish Bar Mitzvah. And we find the Boy Jesus in the Temple. Or at least his parents find him after he goes missing for three days in the temple among the teachers of the law. They find him listening and asking questions.

Reading: Luke 2:41-52
Every year the parents of Jesus went to Jerusalem for the Passover Festival. 42When Jesus was twelve years old, they went to the festival as usual. 43When the festival was over, they started back home, but the boy Jesus stayed in Jerusalem. His parents did not know this; 44they thought that he was with the group, so they travelled a whole day and then started looking for him among their relatives and friends. 45They did not find him, so they went back to Jerusalem looking for him. 46On the third day they found him in the Temple, sitting with the Jewish teachers, listening to them and asking questions. 47All who heard him were amazed at his intelligent answers. 48His parents were astonished when they saw him, and his mother said to him, “My son, why have you done this to us? Your father and I have been terribly worried trying to find you.”

49He answered them, “Why did you have to look for me? Didn't you know that I had to be in my Father's house?”50But they did not understand his answer.

51So Jesus went back with them to Nazareth, where he was obedient to them. His mother treasured all these things in her heart. 52 Jesus grew both in body and in wisdom, gaining favour with God and people.

That’s the classic Jewish way of reading the Scriptures.

There’s a tendency among especially Protestant Christians to narrow the meaning down of a passage of Scripture and say ‘this is what it means’. The Jewish way of reading the Scriptures is always to ask more questions.

Luke then tells us of the Preaching of John the Baptist and his arrest not before he had shared in the Baptism of Jesus. We then learn of the  Ancestors of Jesus and the temptation of Jesus. And then Jesus’ ministry of teaching, and healing begins. It’s not long before he goes back to Nazareth where he is welcomed as a teacher in the Synagogue gathering that has been a part of his growing up. The place where people teach and people ask questions of the Scripture.

Luke has left us in no doubt by now that Jesus knows his Scriptures. No wonder he is asked to speak.

Words of Grace

Reading: Luke 4:16-22

Then Jesus went to Nazareth, where he had been brought up, and on the Sabbath he went as usual to the synagogue. He stood up to read the Scriptures 17and was handed the book of the prophet Isaiah. He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it is written:

18 “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me,

because he has chosen me to bring good news to the poor.

He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives

and recovery of sight to the blind;

to set free the oppressed

19and announce that the time has come

when the Lord will save his people.”

20Jesus rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the attendant, and sat down. All the people in the synagogue had their eyes fixed on him, 21as he said to them, “This passage of scripture has come true today, as you heard it being read.”

22They were all well impressed with him and marvelled at the eloquent words that he spoke. They said, “Isn't he the son of Joseph?”

The Good news Bible lets us down when it speaks of ‘the eloquent words that he spoke.”  Literally it can be translated ‘words of grace’ that he spoke.

I like that translation – that’s the point.

Jesus speaks wonderful words of grace – that was the message of Jesus Luke had absorbed from Paul – grace was at the heart of his understanding of the Christian faith. It is right here at the beginning.

Let’s join in singing a celebration of these words of grace …

Hy-Spirit – Only by grace

But something happens then that changes the atmosphere. In verse 22 everyone there is well impressed and marvel at those words of grace.

But by verse 28 the mood had changed and those there were filled with anger, filled with rage so much so they took him out of the town and tried to push him over a cliff. What happened to make them change?

Reading: Luke 4:23-30

He said to them, “I am sure that you will quote this proverb to me, ‘Doctor, heal yourself.’ You will also tell me to do here in my home town the same things you heard were done in Capernaum.24 I tell you this,” Jesus added, “prophets are never welcomed in their home town.

25 “Listen to me: it is true that there were many widows in Israel during the time of Elijah, when there was no rain for 3.5 years and a severe famine spread throughout the whole land.26 Yet Elijah was not sent to anyone in Israel, but only to a widow living in Zarephath in the territory of Sidon.27 And there were many people suffering from a dreaded skin disease who lived in Israel during the time of the prophet Elisha; yet not one of them was healed, but only Naaman the Syrian.”

28When the people in the synagogue heard this, they were filled with anger. 29They rose up, dragged Jesus out of the town, and took him to the top of the hill on which their town was built. They meant to throw him over the cliff, 30but he walked through the middle of the crowd and went his way.

The powerful words from Isaiah 61 that Jesus reads from are like a manifesto statement of his mission. And it’s what the people want to hear.

There’s good news for the poor … but they really are only concerned about their own poor.

There’s liberty for the captives but it’s really only their own captives they are concerned for.

There’s sight for the blind so long as it’s their blind,

Freedom for the oppressed so long as it is their oppressed.

All that is taken for granted. And it’s so often how we feel. Charity starts at home. It’s those who are like us we are concerned for.

But Jesus then goes on to follow a classic Jewish way of teaching. He explains what is meant in those words from Isaiah by telling two stories. It is not insignificant that the first is a story of Elijah and the second a story of Elisha. Elijah was the first of the great Prophets of the Hebrew Scriptures who spoke God’s word to the powers that be of his time. And Elisha took up his mantle and followed on in his footsteps.
Elijah gave food to the Gentile widow of Zarepath and Elisha healed the Gentile commander of the enemy Syrian army Naaman.

Jesus left no one in any doubt hehad come to bring

Good News to the poor whoever the poor might be, Jew and Gentile.

Liberty for the captives whoever the captives might be, Jew and Gentile.

Sight to the blind whoever the blind might be, Jew and Gentile.

Freedom for the oppressed, whoever the oppressed might be, Jew and Gentile.

Here Jesus is offering an alternative way of reading the Scriptures they had not encountered before.

It opens them out to include all people.

And it is a powerful and radical way we need to hear today as well.

We live in dangerous times.

It’s our people that are all important.

No, says Jesus it is all people that are all important.

The first decade of the Twentieth Century was a time when people put us first – Rudyard Kipling wrote a poem in which he said with great pride East is East and West is West and never the twain shall meet.

The Minister of one of our churches, who wrote poems and hymns under a pen name as John OXenham, wrote a hymn that was a riposte to that Me First way of thinking.


624 In Christ there is no east or west
Prayers of Concern
HTC 324 God of grace
Something to share
A Hy-Spirit Song
Words of Blessing


A Journey of Faith - Seeking Common Ground


Sunday 3rd June 2018

Text for the Week: The God who made the world and everything in it, he who is Lord of heaven and earth, does not live in shrines made by human hands, nor is he served by human hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all people life and breath and all things. Acts 17:24-25

Welcome to our services today and a special welcome to any worshipping with us for the first time. It’s a big, bustling modern city on the verge of being overwhelmed by air pollution. But Athens is also a wonderful ancient city opening up a window on to the world of the New Testament. Long ago I visited in the company of a good friend who went by the name of Paul. We made for a hill overlooking the Acropolis: was it somewhere nearby that another Paul had long ago debated with the philosophers and thinkers of that great ancient city? Now it’s in ruins: then it was in its splendour a wonderful temple to the goddess that gave the city her name, Athene. A remarkable feat of engineering, a remarkable design, it remains a wonder of the world. And yet it is nothing compared to the breath-taking views of sea and mountains that Paul and his travelling companion, Luke, must have enjoyed. The God of creation cannot be contained in buildings made from stone, for God is Lord of all and gives to all people life and breath and all things. Paul looks not just to the God of creation but to the God who in Jesus Christ comes alongside us and stays with us wherever the journey leads us.

Welcome and Call to Worship
182 Now thank we all our God
Prayer and the Lord’s Prayer
Paul’s Story
Reading: Acts 20:7-12



A Hy-Spirit Song
Activities for all over 3

A Focus on Jesus

How do you come to be here?

And I don’t mean, how did you get here?

Where did your journey of faith start?

Is it something that’s just grown, is it something that’s always been there, is it something that had a moment when it began?

Share with someone near you …

A time to share

And then a time to share with the rest of us too … if anyone wants to.

We first meet him under the name of Saul in Acts 8 looking after the cloaks of those who are stoning Stephen to death and he is approving of that brutal execution. The next we know something has happened to change him. And it’s not long before we know him as Paul. He’s had a new start.

There was an encounter
He saw in a new way
He had a new strength within
And he had a message.

And at the heart of it all was Jesus. He thought of it as a meeting with the risen Christ.

And it happened at that very moment when he was bent on pursuing the followers of Jesus and eliminating them from Damascus as he had endeavoured to eliminate them from Jerusalem.

It was life-changing.
It wasn’t just a flash of light he saw or a voice he heard it was the one he met that make a difference. IT was nothing less than the risen Christ.

It wasn’t just a healing he experienced – it was as if he had a whole new way of seeing things. And it came about not just through the faithfulness of Ananias but through that time of prayer Ananias was devoted to.

And then he had a strength from beyond himself in the Holy Spirit that filled him – and standing up he was baptized.

He stayed with the believers and went to the synagogues and he had something he did.

He has a message to share – for Gentiles and kings and the people of God

He began to preach that Jesus was the Son of God.

The focus was on Jesus. And it was to make a difference.

This was a message for Gentiles – and for Kings – this is a message for the Roman world – with the heart of the region in Damascus and the Roman province of Syria. It’s for Gentiles – who is son of god in that Gentile world but the Roman emperor – Tiberius has given way to Caligula and then to Claudius – but no Jesus is the one to look to. Straightaway a message that is to the powers that be.

But it is also for the people of Israel – who looked to their kings as sons of God to. But Jesus is the one to look for who demands our allegiance.

Look to Jesus – it’s the start – but it sets the scene for the rest of his life. He takes time out maybe as long as 14 years but then he begins – and he journeys a little way into Asia minor, Eastern Turkey today, then further afield and over into what we think of as Europe. And then Athens and Corinth – makes a collection to go to Jerusalem and finds himself arrested – on trial he tells his story twice more. Until finally, the shipwreck in Malta over, he makes it to Rome albeit under arrest. And Acts finishes with that wonderful statement.

He lived there for two whole years at his own expense and welcomed all who came to him, proclaiming the kingdom of God and teaching about the Lord Jesus Christ with all boldness and without hindrance.

And it all finds its focus on Jesus

No matter what our story, no matter what it is that brings us here – it is to Jesus we turn and to Jesus we look.

A Hy-Spirit song – focusing on Jesus

Common Ground

What Paul does is interesting – we find him there preaching of Jesus the Son of God. The words are interesting – he proclaims – it’s the proclamation of a herald – Jesus -the son of God we look to.

Paul teaches, he declares the good news, he preaches. But there’s one more thing we find Paul doing.

He argues, is one way of putting it. The word is the word we get dialogue from – he enters into dialogue. He does that in the synagogue with those who are Jewish and he draws on the Hebrew Scriptures – again he is influenced by the way of reading the Hebrew Scriptures the very first followers of Jesus have been directed to – they have at their heart, Jesus. He is the fulfilment of all those Scriptures.

The Hebrew Scriptures are the common ground he has.

But when he finds himself with people who do not have the Scriptures as their sacred text he seeks common ground. And again he enters into dialogue, he enters into discussions with them.

6While Paul was waiting in Athens for Silas and Timothy, he was greatly upset when he noticed how full of idols the city was. 17So he held discussions in the synagogue with the Jews and with the Gentiles who worshipped God, and also in the public square every day with the people who happened to pass by. 18Certain Epicurean and Stoic teachers also debated with him. Some of them asked, “What is this ignorant show-off trying to say?”

So it is that he gives an account of himself.

He moves from discussion to declare the good news

Others answered, “He seems to be talking about foreign gods.” They said this because Paul was preaching about Jesus and the resurrection. 19So they took Paul, brought him before the city council, the Areopagus, and said, “We would like to know what this new teaching is that you are talking about. 20Some of the things we hear you say sound strange to us, and we would like to know what they mean.” 21(For all the citizens of Athens and the foreigners who lived there liked to spend all their time telling and hearing the latest new thing.)


And he finds common ground with the people he is engaging with.

aul stood up in front of the city council and said,

“I see that in every way you Athenians are very religious. 23For as I walked through your city and looked at the places where you worship, I found an altar on which is written, ‘To an Unknown God’. That which you worship, then, even though you do not know it, is what I now proclaim to you.

He starts where they are … and leads them to new ground.

 24 God, who made the world and everything in it, is Lord of heaven and earth and does not live in temples made by human hands. 25Nor does he need anything that we can supply by working for him, since it is he himself who gives life and breath and everything else to everyone. 26From one human being he created all races on earth and made them live throughout the whole earth. He himself fixed beforehand the exact times and the limits of the places where they would live.

A wonderful sense of the awe and majesty of the God of creation. A sense of seeking – maybe a common strand in so many people.

 27He did this so that they would look for him, and perhaps find him as they felt about for him. Yet God is actually not far from any one of us; 28as someone has said,

‘In him we live and move and exist.’

It is as some of your poets have said,

‘We too are his children.’

Paul finds the common ground – he quotes now from the works his audience are reading.

29Since we are God's children, we should not suppose that his nature is anything like an image of gold or silver or stone, shaped by human art and skill. 30God has overlooked the times when people did not know him, but now he commands all of them everywhere to turn away from their evil ways. 31For he has fixed a day in which he will judge the whole world with justice by means of a man he has chosen. He has given proof of this to everyone by raising that man from death!”

And now he turns to Jesus – and again the focus is on Jesus. The one who opens up a window on to God and discloses God to be the God of love.

32When they heard Paul speak about a raising from death, some of them made fun of him, but others said, “We want to hear you speak about this again.” 33And so Paul left the meeting. 34Some men joined him and believed, among whom was Dionysius, a member of the council; there was also a woman named Damaris, and some other people.

Among all the people named is one woman – named Damaris – the inspiration for an initiative that has used film as a starting point for discussion – maybe an area of common ground to explore further.

Common Ground
Reading: Acts 17:22-31
470 Jesus shall reign
Prayers of Concern
604 Holy wisdom, lamp of learning
Words of Blessing


Sunday, May 20, 2018

A Pentecost Celebration of Baptism


Text for the week:   Jesus stood up and said in a loud voice, “Whoever is thirsty should come to me, and whoever believes in me should drink. As the scripture says, ‘Streams of life-giving water will pour out from his heart.’ ” Jesus said this about the Spirit, which those who believed in him were going to receive. John 7:37-39

Welcome to our services for Pentecost and a special welcome to any who are worshipping with us for the first time. It’s the fiftieth day after the day of Resurrection and it’s the festival of Pentecost, the day when we celebrate the gift of the Holy Spirit. Flowing water, living breath, powerful wind, cleansing flame. There are so many ways of thinking of the Holy Spirit! Our service opens as Helen Bloxham invites us to turn to the one who ‘breathes life’ who restores and renews. We’ll then focus on that wonderful image Jesus shared with his friends of life-giving water that’s poured over us and brings us a newness of life as we share in Baptism with Bethany. Then in the second part of the service Karen Waldock and Karen Haden have been putting some thoughts together out of our Explore group about that transformative power of the Holy Spirit for us all which Karen Waldock is going to share with us. This is the faith we share: Now that we have been put right with God through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. He has brought us by faith into this experience of God's grace, in which we now live. And so we boast of the hope we have of sharing God's glory! We also boast of our troubles, because we know that trouble produces endurance, endurance brings God's approval, and his approval creates hope. This hope does not disappoint us, for God has poured out his love into our hearts by means of the Holy Spirit, who is God's gift to us. Romans 5:1-5

You breathe life, you restore – Hill song – introduced by Helen B
Welcome - Helen
582 O day of joy and wonder
Prayer and the Lord’s Prayer

It’s Pentecost – what do you associate with the Sprit of God?

For Jesus it began at his baptism by John in the Jordan … in water –
  
 and water became a wonderful symbol of new life – as he shared with the Samaritan woman at the well

Jesus answered, “If only you knew what God gives and who it is that is asking you for a drink, you would ask him, and he would give you life-giving water.”

11“Sir,” the woman said, “you haven't got a bucket, and the well is deep. Where would you get that life-giving water? 12It was our ancestor Jacob who gave us this well; he and his sons and his flocks all drank from it. You don't claim to be greater than Jacob, do you?”

13Jesus answered, “All those who drink this water will be thirsty again,14but whoever drinks the water that I will give him will never be thirsty again. The water that I will give him will become in him a spring which will provide him with life-giving water and give him eternal life.”

Water, Breath, Wind and Fire

On the last and most important day of the festival Jesus stood up and said in a loud voice, “Whoever is thirsty should come to me, and38 whoever believes in me should drink. As the scripture says, ‘Streams of life-giving water will pour out from his side.’ ” 39Jesus said this about the Spirit, which those who believed in him were going to receive. At that time the Spirit had not yet been given, because Jesus had not been raised to glory.

Breath – was another wonderful image – the breath that gives life –

John 21

Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father sent me, so I send you.” 22Then he breathed on them and said, “Receive the Holy Spirit. 23 If you forgive people's sins, they are forgiven; if you do not forgive them, they are not forgiven.”

For forty days Jesus appeared to them … and then his last words to them asked them to wait …

Reading: Acts 1:4-5

and when they came together, he gave them this order: “Do not leave Jerusalem, but wait for the gift I told you about, the gift my Father promised. 5 John baptized with water, but in a few days you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit.”

They waited and they waited

A day and a night,

Another day

A week passed

And another day and night

And another day and night

And another day and night …

And then it happened

Wind and fire …
Reading: Acts 2:1-4

When the day of Pentecost came, all the believers were gathered together in one place. 2Suddenly there was a noise from the sky which sounded like a strong wind blowing, and it filled the whole house where they were sitting. 3Then they saw what looked like tongues of fire which spread out and touched each person there. 4They were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to talk in other languages, as the Spirit enabled them to speak.

They had a remarkable strength – they could get up – they had a new strength about them.

But it was only the beginning of something new. We’ve heard the Christmas story and the Easter Story now it’s time for the Story not just of Pentecost but the beginning of something that’s still going on!



We share in Baptism

In our font we have a scallop shell – it’s a very special one. When your Mum and Dad got married there was a sea shell theme – and you’re your mum was baptized here we used a scallop shell to pour the water over – so that’s a great family connection. But also the scallop shell has been significant in pilgrimages Christians have made down through the centuries. They would wear a scallop shell to show they were pilgrims. Maybe as you profess your faith today it’s part of a journey you are on – and that journey is a journey with God always with you, Christ in your heart and the Spirit to guide you.

In some ways Baptism is a sign of belonging to the church, being part of a church family. But much more than that, at heart it’s a wonderful reminder that being a Christian doesn’t start with anything we do – as if we could do something to persuade God to accept us. Neither does it start with anything we believe as if we needed to have exactly the right kind of faith to be accepted by God. It all starts with the free gift of God’s love that’s poured over us because God loves us and accepts us just as we are. That’s the wonderful message of God’s grace – a free gift given to us all.

So, I am going to pour water over you – and it’s real water. Just as the water is real, so too God’s love is real – and it’s poured over you completely. It’s the water Jesus experienced in his baptism, it’s the life-giving water he shared with the woman at the well and spoke of in the temple – it’s the water that pours over us.

The wonderful thing about the love of God is that it can really make a difference in our lives – help us through difficult times, open up for us a way of living that’s based on that love and involves love for God and love for our neighbour and love for everyone around us.

So, that’s the same with the love of God. The love of God reaches out to us, pours over us just as we are, however young, however old, but for it to make a difference in our lives we have to make it our own.

You, Bethany, have grown up here very much as part of the Church Family – but you have not been baptized. You have said that you want to be baptised because your faith has become important to you. So in baptism we are celebrating the way God’s love reaches out to you and is poured over you – just as the water is real, so too the water of life, the life-giving Spirit of God is real and can transform your life – For it to make a difference you need to respond to that free gift of God’s love in faith – and so after you have been baptized I am going to ask you to rise up in the strength of God’s spirit – the strength of God in your life and I am going to ask you to make your profession of faith.

So I ask you, Bethany, to kneel

Bethany, I baptize you in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit



Bethany, do you believe in God and in Jesus Christ as your Lord and Saviour?       I do.

The Lord bless you and keep you;
the Lord make his face to shine upon you, and be gracious to you;
the Lord lift up his countenance upon you, and give you peace.

I will take your name to our Church Meeting at the beginning of June and then at a Communion Service we will extend the right hand of fellowship and welcome you into membership of the Church of Jesus Christ here at Highbury and the Church worldwide.


I am now going to ask the whole Church Family here which of course includes your Mum and Dad to stand together with all those who have come specially for today’s service. I invite you to share in a statement of faith using words of Paul from Romans 5 in which he takes that imagery first used by Jesus of the living water that flows out from Christ in the power of the spirit and is poured over each one of us and makes the world of difference in the living of our lives. The words are on our notice sheet and on the screen.

Now that we have been put right with God through faith,
we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.
He has brought us by faith into this experience of God's grace,
in which we now live.
And so we boast of the hope we have of sharing God's glory!
We also boast of our troubles,
because we know that trouble produces endurance,
endurance brings God's approval,
and his approval creates hope.

This hope does not disappoint us,
for God has poured out his love into our hearts
by means of the Holy Spirit, who is God's gift to us. Amen.

Prayer – Mary B

We have a gift for Bethany – a Bible – with a guide to help you get into the Bible. Think of it as a guide on that journey of faith you are on.

Hy-Spirit are going to lead us in a song

A Hy-Spirit Song

It’s the end of Christian  Aid Week – we are going to dedicate the Christian Aid Week collection.

A prayer for the building of God’s Kingdom
Give us, Lord God,
a vision of your Kingdom as your love desires it:
a world where the weak are protected, and none go
hungry,
a world where life is shared, and enjoyed by all,
a world where all races, nations and cultures live in
tolerance and respect,
a world where peace is built with justice, and justice is
guided by love.
Give us the inspiration and courage to build your
Kingdom here and now.
Amen.


Activities for All Over 3

The Difference the Spirit Makes – Karen Waldock

As part of the Holy trinity the Holy Spirit has been around since the beginning of time. It has always been a powerful and active presence in the world from the beginning of Genesis where it plays its part in creation hovering over the water expectantly waiting for things to come into being and is there all the way through the story of the people of Israel, in the Hebrew scriptures, from Joseph through to the prophets . In the Old Testament we read of the Holy Spirit only being with great chosen leaders like Moses and Gideon, kings like Saul, David and Solomon and the prophets. It empowered them to lead the people of Israel, to make the right choices, to call for justice, to convict the people of their sin and reassures them of God’s willingness to forgive. It gave those chosen ones courage, intelligence, wisdom and skill needed to do what God wanted them to do. All of this was not for the benefit of the individual, but for the good of all the people of Israel

When we move into the New Testament we read how the Holy Spirit descended on Jesus at his baptism to show God’s approval and marking Jesus as a chosen person, it remained with him throughout his ministry and even played a part in his resurrection. But something momentous happened after Jesus was taken back into heaven, he promised a helper and that helper arrived in a most dramatic way and it is that which we celebrate today, Pentecost. Firstly the Holy Spirit was poured out on all those gathered in the house and then on all the believers male, female, young old, Jew, gentile and later on even the Samaritans!

What effect did the Holy Spirit have on them? The disciples had been waiting quietly together, waiting for the helper that Jesus had promised and after a dramatic scene with a violent wind and tongues of fire the Holy Spirit came and they all became bold, excited and they went out into the street speaking in different languages. The Spirit also gave them the words to use to convince the people of the good news of Jesus Christ and about three thousand became believers that day. But this was not a one off event, the Holy Spirit did not just come once and then leave and it remained with them. They continued to seek the spirit’s leading all the way through the building of the early churches, from choosing new leaders, and to making key decisions about the distribution of food. It led them to see different people, speak boldly in difficult situations, to take the gospel to so many different people in so many different countries and to create unity amongst all the believers whatever their religious or ethnic background.

This Holy Spirit is as active and powerful force today as it was it the times of the early church, there are so many ways in which the Spirit can work through people today. There are the fruits of the spirit and the gifts of the spirit, for Explore I had a list of 27 different ways in which the spirit work in people in the Bible, but there are more than I had listed. It is available to all believers in all circumstances, to help us and strengthen us when to go through difficult times, to do the things we cannot do in our own strength and at other times the Holy Spirit can inspire us to new and different things, guiding us and making us bolder and braver than we could ever be alone. Even when we struggle to pray, not knowing how best to pray or what to pray for Romans 8:26 tells us that “the Spirit helps us in our weakness. “ The Holy Spirit intercedes for us. It empowers us for our foremost commission, to go make disciples and spread the good news of Jesus Christ. It is power, it is knowledge, it brings us closer to God and helps us to encourage others. The Holy Spirit is a vital partner in the creative redemptive work of God and it draws us into that process.

The Holy Spirit can work in a private, quiet way within an individual or sometimes it works in more obvious and visible ways in groups and churches. The Holy Spirit is not just important for us as individuals it is vital for the church. It brought the early believers together, bound them in unity and helped them to function as a loving and cohesive group. Different gifts were given to different members of the church so that all of the work necessary for the functioning and growth of the church could be carried out effectively and to the benefit of everyone.

The Holy Spirit is here in this church, it is real and it is moving not solely for our individual benefit, but also for the benefit of the whole church.  It works in us so that we can love each other, work together for justice, peace and healing in this broken world. It helps us to serve God, our community and each other. How can we tap into this power and understand where the Holy Spirit is leading us? We have to learn how to listen to the Holy Spirit. Just as the first disciples did we need to regularly meet together, to pray, to read the Bible and to wait for God to reveal his will to us. When we have a church meeting we are trying to “find the mind of Christ” through the leading of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit does not force us, it does not shout, but guides gentle and it is a very real power source we can tap into.

I have to say that I, along with many others, found the address given by Bishop Michael Curry at the Royal wedding very inspiring and I encourage you to read the whole transcript, but this part in particularly caught my attention, he said  “Someone once said that Jesus began most revolutionary movement in all of human history, a movement grounded in the unconditional love of god for the world-and a movement mandating people to live that love and in so doing, to change not only their lives but the very life of the world itself. I'm talking about power, real power, power to change the world.”

He was talking about love, but not the fickle and imperfect kind of love that we, as human beings, are capable of in our own strength, but the real unconditional love that we are capable of through the power of the Holy Spirit.

So here is our challenge as individuals and as a church. Do not worry about what is ahead of us, God knows what we need and he will not abandon us. We need to wait and listen for God to reveal his plan for us through leading of the Holy Spirit. Wait, listen and share God’s love with each other and all those around us and remember that as  2 Timothy 1:7 says “For God did not give us a spirit of timidity, but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline.”


Spirit of wisdom and understanding, enlighten our minds to perceive the mysteries of the universe in relation to eternity. Spirit of right judgment and courage, guide us and make us firm in our baptismal decision to follow Jesus' way of love. Spirit of knowledge and reverence, help us to see the lasting value of justice and mercy in our everyday dealings with one another. May we respect life as we work to solve problems of family and nation, economy and ecology. Spirit of God, spark our faith, hope and love into new action each day. Fill our lives with wonder and awe in your presence which penetrates all creation. Amen (from Catholic.org)

595 O Breath of life

Prayers of Concern

A Hy-Spirit Song

The Lord’s Supper

615 Holy Spirit, ever living

Words of Blessing

So much to pass on at Highbury

If you give a little love you can get a little love of your own

A blessing shared at Highbury

Now and the Future at Highbury

Dreaming Dreams Sharing Visions at Highbury

Dreaming Dreams Sharing Visions

Darkness into Light